03_01

Cahutchu #01 | 2006 | 75 x 50 cm | edition of 5 | c-print

03_02

Cahutchu #02 | 2006 | 50 x 75 cm | edition of 5 | c-print

03_03

Cahutchu #03 | 2006 | 120 x 87 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_04

Cahutchu #04 | 2006 | 120 x 87 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_05

Cahutchu #05 | 2006 | 50 x 75 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_06

Cahutchu #06 | 2006 | 50 x 75 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_07

Cahutchu #07 | 2006 | 50 x 75 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_08

Cahutchu #08 | 2006 | 50 x 75 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_09

Cahutchu #09 | 2006 | 150 x 61 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_10

Cahutchu #10 | 2006 | 75 x 80 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_11

Cahutchu #11 | 2006 | 50 x 65 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_12

Cahutchu #12 | 2006 | 55 x 80 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_13

Cahutchu #13 | 2006 | 45 x 70 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

03_14

Cahutchu #14 | 2006 | 55 x 70 cm | edition of 7 | c-print

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Cahutchu is the photographic memory of a rubber community that rose from nothing in the early years of the 20th century, developing into a metropolis that vanished almost as soon as it appeared, due to the enormous fluctuations in the rubber market. Today the city is virtually swallowed up by the surrounding jungle. The community's precarious existence and rapid disappearance form a remarkable contrast with the images that remain - images that now survive for eternity. Photographs, drawings, etchings and engravings tell the story of grand estates, the reclamation of the jungle by forced labour and the eventual bankruptcy of the whole enterprise. Paper is the only witness of what has passed. The artist's fascination for the exceptional nature of these documents led him to make a direct reconstruction of this material. Working from a desire to bring his sources back to life and manipulate them, De Beijer took the paper itself as his point of departure. The artist strove to create a personal visual testimonial, resulting in a series of computer-generated scale models that were then printed out and assembled in his studio. In this way, De Beijer has literally brought a new dimension to his sources, by incorporating them in the physical reality of his studio in order to recapture them in new photographic images.